BEFORE AND AFTER CASES

Anterior Openbite

This is where there is a lack of contact between the upper and lower front teeth when the patient is biting together.

This leads to problems with eating, wear to the back teeth and trouble keeping the lips together.

The open bite may be caused by a finger/thumb or cloth sucking habit or it may be caused by poor position of the jaws.

Closure of the open bite can occur naturally if the finger/thumb or cloth sucking habit is stopped before the adult front teeth start to erupt around 6 years of age.

Before treatment
After treatment
If the open bite is caused by poor position of the jaws often involves undertaking both brace treatment and jaw surgery.
Before treatment
After treatment
A dramatic improvement can be expected not only with the bite, but also the ability to achieve lip seal and improved facial appearance.

Deep Overbite

This is where the upper front teeth overlap the lower front teeth too far.

This leads to problems of excessive wear to the front teeth and gum problems where the front teeth bite on the gum.

The deep bite may be caused by the front teeth erupting further than the cheek teeth resulting in a curve to the biting surface of the dental arches.

Correction of the deep over bite involves braces that will straighten and level the bite. Often the front teeth are intruded to level these teeth with the cheek teeth.

Before treatment
After treatment
A dramatic improvement can be expected not only with the bite, but also healthier gums. The teeth will be straighter with an improved smile line.

Anterior Crossbite

This is where the upper front teeth bite incorrectly behind the lower front teeth. This leads to wear to the front teeth, gum and jaw joint problems.

The cross bite may be caused by poor position of the teeth, or poor position of the jaws or a combination of the teeth and jaws.

Correction of the anterior cross bite can involve braces to move the upper front teeth forward so they bite in front of the lower teeth.

This can be done with a removable brace in early child hood.

Before treatment
After treatment
It may also involve braces and use of elastic bands to help move the upper front teeth forward and lower front back so that at the completion of treatment the cross bite is corrected.
Before treatment
After treatment
If the anterior cross bite is caused by poor position of the jaws, treatment may involve both fixed braces and jaw surgery.
Before treatment
After treatment
If the anterior cross bite is caused by poor position of the jaws, treatment may involve both fixed braces and jaw surgery.

Large Overbite

This is where the upper front teeth bite too far in front of the lower front teeth. These are often referred to as “buck teeth” or upper front teeth that "stick out".

This can be caused by poor positioning of the upper front teeth, a short lower jaw or a combination of poor upper front teeth and short lower jaw.

A large overjet can lead to an increased risk of trauma to the upper front teeth, drying out of the gum around the upper front teeth and lack of lip seal.

Treatment often involves braces to retract the upper front teeth so they bite better with the lower front teeth and allow easy lip seal. If the overjet is caused by poor positioning of the upper front teeth a removable or fixed brace may be used.

If a fixed brace is used often elastic bands are used to retract the upper front teeth and advance the lower front teeth to help reduce the overjet.

Before treatment
After treatment
If the large overjet is caused by a short lower jaw sometimes a combination of braces and jaw surgery is required to fully correct the overjet.

A dramatic improvement can be expected with improved bite, healthier gums and an improved and confident smile.

Spaced Teeth

This is where the front teeth are either poorly positioned, small or missing resulting in spacing or gaps

Spaced teeth are often treated by moving the teeth closer together with braces.

Before treatment
After treatment
If some of the front teeth are missing, the spaces can be closed with braces moving all the front teeth together and the cheek teeth forward. Some cosmetic dentistry is often required to modify the shape of some teeth to disguise the missing teeth.

If some of the front teeth are missing, the spaces can be reopened with braces moving the front teeth into their correct positions and then placing false teeth into the gaps. This is initially with a plate and longer term implants.

Crowded Teeth

This is where there is in not enough room with the dental arches for all the teeth to be straight.

There are often other problems with the bite that require correcting as well as the crowding. Crowded teeth are hard to clean and can lead to wear and gum problems.

Crowded teeth are straightened with braces and may require either expansion of the dental arches tor extraction of some teeth to find enough space to straighten the teeth.

Before treatment
After treatment

Impacted Teeth

This is where teeth fail to erupt and are often referred to as "impacted" or "unerupted" teeth.

The most common impacted teeth are the upper canines but can include other teeth including the upper front teeth.

To retrieve and align these impacted teeth often these teeth have to gum uncovered from the tooth ("an exposure”) before braces are place to allow the tooth to be erupted into the line of the dental arch.

Before treatment x-ray showing impacted canine tooth angled across incisor teeth.

Before treatment x-ray showing impacted canine tooth angled across incisor teeth
Before treatment
After treatment